Remedial Novel Writing – Lesson 4

Or How to Write a Novel When You Have No Idea What You’re Doing

Ah, revising. My revising is really becoming more like rewriting. I have absolutely rewritten the beginning so I’m still really at the beginning. Since my revising is going along at a snail’s pace, I thought I’d address one of the things that can stump a remedial novel writer: what to say when someone asks what you’re writing. For example, you might say, “I’m writing science fiction novel about… “. Or “I’m writing a historical fiction novel that’s set in World War I.”

Or, you could be writing, as I am, a story that is not so easily categorized. Today’s lesson will cover:

Genres and Subgenres

The easy definition is that genres are just a way of categorizing your writing. Since this is about novel writing, I’m going to assume that you’re writing fiction. Other primary writing genres are non-fiction, drama, poetry and from one source I found, folklore (which, to me would be a sub-genre of fiction).

So. My novel is fiction. Almost entirely made up with a smattering of things that may or may not be true. For example, it’s set in Texas (a real place) in a small town called Grace (not a real place).

But then what? This is where it gets a little hairy, people. Some of the most basic kinds of subgenres you will find are historical fiction, science fiction, thrillers, horror, mysteries, women’s (huh? Did Hemingway write “men’s” fiction? I think not), fantasy and speculative. If you said, what the EF is speculative fiction, I was right there with ya!

The best definition I found (and most thorough explanation) was written by author Annie Neugebauer in her blog post What is Speculative Fiction? She writes that speculative fiction is “any fiction in which the ‘laws’ of that world (explicit or implied) are different than ours.” She also has an excellent Venn diagram explaining spec fic and the inherent problems in being too rigid in how that diagram works. In other words, the lines she draws can be “blurred” and you can have a novel that falls into more than one section of the diagram.

This is exactly the problem I have in describing a novel in any one or two subgenres. The problems is that publishers need/want that definition. Can you write a romantic forensic thriller where the hero has supernatural powers? Well, yeah.

None of this matters too much if you decide to self publish except that you want to at least know the best group or groups of people to aim a marketing campaign at and if you want to sell any copies, then marketing is a necessary evil. If you want to take a crack at traditional publishing, then you need to know the best place to pitch your manuscript to. If you pitch a speculative medical thriller to a publisher or agent with a primary interest in World War II erotic romances your manuscript is going to be flying right back at you faster than you can say Andromeda Strain.

Confused? I’m confessing that I am a bit because sometimes unexpected events in your novel happen that effect the category. Imagine my surprise when my heroine finds a dead body in the vault of the old bank building she bought and turned into an art gallery with living quarters upstairs.

That’s a mystery that I’m certainly going to have to deal with during this revising period!

By the way, this Writer’s Digest article has great explanations of the various (and many) subgenres.

Remedial Novel Reading Lesson 1, Lesson 2, Lesson 3

 

 

 

 

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